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20100921
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members, the elected officials. come up to the party and stay here with us. >> who says asians don't have rhythm? that's it,on't have rhythm? that's it, ladies and gentlemen, for the kickoff performance for asian-pacific american heritage month. thank you very much for coming. we hope to see you at the reception. good night! >> weren't they great? i think they deserve another round of your thanks. they are thurgood marshall high school like school crew. -- light show crew. they were formed to demonstrate asian culture through the art of glow sticks. glow sticks are synonymous with the buyer dancing from hawaii. they did a great job with those close sticks. -- with those glow stick. i am going to serve as your mc. the first rule of thumb i get to ask of all of you is please turn off your cell phones. we would really appreciate it if you could check right now to see that yourself bones are on silent mode are completely off. -- that your cell phones are completely off or on silent mode. we have some great performances coming up. they deserve your attention. we ask you the favor to che
, and ecology, u.s. bank, and from the heritage he tends level, day crossing and bills and, for all those heritage level sponsors, come on -- one big giant thank you. thank you, thank you, thank you. [applause] and now, i want to say -- it is my business, so you have to really help me thank them. our media sponsors. and our media sponsors, i want to say special thanks to abc7, comcast, once again, inquire.net, sfgovtv, the sense francisco examiner, world channel, and am 1400. please help me bank of the media sponsors. [applause] now, please help me welcome the woman who is an incredible force, the woman who had the vision to bring this together, to bring us all together -- she is the founder and chair of the apa heritage celebration committee. come on out, claudine. [applause] >> welcome to the 2010 celebration of asian pacific american heritage month. on behalf of the celebration committee, all the names are here. which includes representatives from city officials and executives from over 10 @ nicholas in the asian-pacific american family. i welcome you here. -- over 10 representatives.
political newspaper magazine that used music to bring in an audience. so, my question, what about the new journalists today reaching out to the 20-year-old and 30- year-old? your comment about the two schools of journalism and reaching out, getting quality journalism to the public, how will we do that? >> we have a couple of issues here. the old school and the new school. i guess the question would be -- is there a standard? a single standard anymore for journalism? >> i do not know who sets that standard anymore. frightening, sometimes, to hear the fact that the most trusted name in news is jon stewart. but who can argue that there is not some good quality reporting and information that goes on on a show like that? i think it will be far reaching. we have young people, both in print and on the internet. it is a wide range of opportunity. i do not know that there is any one standard today that anyone could point to that would be the single source. >> what about the chronicle right now? reducing $1 million per week, what does that look like right now? >> thank goodness we are not losing $1
outlived its usefulness as a place for residents to live. it was no longer consistent with any medicare or medicaid rules. we were the only facility left in the country running open wards. we were told we would not be allowed any longer by both the federal and state authorities. it was a place where, while the care was wonderful, the building did not fit any modern earthquake standards. where privacy was insufficient to support human dignity. where people did not have a place to store their stuff. where people did not have a window to look out on. where we had to have wards that had closing doors because there was not that easy access to the outside. here we had a vibrant set of people -- residents, nurses, doctors, attendants -- but what we lacked was a space that was equal to them. with that, i hope all of you -- looking around the crowd, so many of you did to make this reality. derek parker set the vision of every room with a window. whether it is one of you who voted for this, or one of our wonderful residents who has been a volunteer here. all of you had a role in creating that fac
with the world premiere of three heads, six arms. the artist came from shanghai to help us celebrate the unavailing. we had a chance to speak with him about his work. >> the san francisco arts commission is pleased to be celebrating their relationship between san high and san francisco. the shanghai and san francisco. this is a 30 relationship that stretches back to win dianne feinstein was the mayor of san francisco. we premiered a new work of art here in san francisco called the three heads, six arms. welcome to san francisco. thank you for bringing your extraordinary sculpture. can you tell me about what inspired you to create this sculpture? >> this started with some trips that i took years ago. i went to to bed and i saw a lot of statues and i started to really feel the spiritual life of people in tibet. it really inspires me and i went back to shanghai and i started the creation of this. >> we see that one of the heads of the bullet it is your face. can you talk about the significance of that? -- we see that one of the heads of the buddha is your face. >> i started doing public
and gentlemen, and of course honorable mr. juan, whan. it is my good pleasure to join us in the dedication ceremony of the three hands-six arms. on this occasion i would like to thank the mayor and his colleagues for the great efforts to promote the chinese culture, and thanks to the san francisco arts commission for providing us with this opportunity to enjoy this buhl art work and to celebrate the sister city relationship between shanghai and san francisco. san francisco is well-known for it's cultural diversity, and it has always a long-standing and profound friendship with the chinese people. the former mayor, diane feinstein proclaimed the inception of the sister-city relationship between the two cities. and thanks to the concerted efforts after these 30 years. this relationship has achieved remarkable and substantial rulls. there have been 225 projects of cooperation between the two cities. many chinese companies have found a home here. i think what is more significant is that this city is going to stage a san francisco place at the world expo in shanghai. that is an expression of pr
, it can save us the energy for the school bus coming so much more. it benefits the san francisco citizenship. we do not need to pay more tax to support the school bus. i had personal issues effective in march and april. my eldest son got accepted into a school. the time to drop him off, my youngest son has to show up at the other school, which is far away. many times, this happens to parents in the school district. we have to save more money in our personal budget so we can let our children go on for higher learning. being parents, we are upset with that. commissioner wynns: we have five minutes left. >> my name is randy wong. i represent an elementary school bilingual program. after fourth grade, our parents have an -- our students have no more bilingual tests. most of our kids decide to change middle schools. i represent the parents' petition. we are against our kids go into a middle school without an immersion program or bilingual program. thank you. >> good evening. i wanted to start by thanking the district for the good faith with which they have listened to parent and commu
that involves talking to us, and more important, listening to us, hearing our voices. so many have worked so hard, has you have been told -- as you have been told, to bring the state to pass. and now we have a dazzling new setting to present to you. when you leave today, you will be going home. but laguna honda residents will not be leaving. this is our home. and it is very important to us. we are already here. but please come back and visit us frequently. this wonderful new laguna honda would not exist without you. i just want to add a personal note. my younger sister, emily, was a resident here for many more years than i have been. she was greatly loved. we lost her recently. i would like to dedicate this speech to her and remembered her, as many of the residents do, with great fondness and affection. thank you all. [applause] >> i would like to invite you all nowi that good enough? this is a participatory ribbon cutting. it requires nothing more complicated than this. i will ask you to count down, not up. upon conclusion, we will applaud the great works of turner construction, the dedicat
unfair of us to say there is no capacity on site for your kid, and there is no capacity and our child development for your kids, so therefore, we are quick to charge you for something that you have been getting for free. so if we're going to ask people to pay, what we need to do is ask it places said that where there is capacity on site, we could say to people, ok, you're going to have to pay for it. so i really would just urge us to be thoughtful about that, it is after school is one of those things that is absolutely essential. you cannot expect a six-year old to get home on the muni by themselves. anyway, so that is my strongest reaction that i have. i think, also, i am open to not grandfathering stops, and i think we have to draw the line somewhere. i just think we have to give notice about this year, you will have it. next year, you will not. as commissioner wynns said, it may be so draconian that i would not vote for it. we cannot be cavalier about that. >> i am going to direct staff to do an analysis on these. as much as i like a lot of these items, the reality is, here we are
. climate change is upon us. it is happening fast. those of us who live in coastal areas will fill the affect of that first. we want to recognize the mayor's leadership in not just the opportunity of building such an important structure -- this is the first leed certified hospital in the state of california, and what that means is the rebuilding of the entire campus is to provide respect, dignity, and validation for all of the residents who will be here at laguna honda, but next importantly that we build something that will come from its conception, enhance the conservation of the water is an energy used in this building, and enhance the co2 emission reductions of this building. mayor, thank you for walking the walk as well as talking the talk. it is something to be proud of, leed-certified. to all the care givers and all the volunteers who make up the family of residents, to express our appreciation for your long hours and for your selfless service, and know that the battles that senator yee and assembly men andiano and i are putting in sacramento right now -- if we let governor h
the disposable incomes associated with that. so we're finding then this uptick in use of marijuana and other substances. so we need to have treatment programs and providers and people who are recovery facilitators understanding that you are dealing with an older population, as well as, you've got to deal not only with young people, adolescents and young adults, but you're now dealing with baby boomers who are entering a seniority. that is an important part. and then when you look at it from a cultural point of view, particularly in cultures where age commands respect, the person who has the alcohol or drug problem is in a conundrum. because they are an elder, if you're dealing with a tribal context, they are someone who is experienced or who is seen by younger people as a person of great respect, and yet they are struggling with their own alcohol and drug problem. when we're talking about at-risk behavior, we know that it exists among the- and is prevalent among the general population. but when it comes to special populations, it's almost something that people really don't stop to address as
as far as adding a unit or selling your building that's useful to know when the building was built and how it was legally or otherwise altered without or with permits so we have with us today three people. just scratching the surface of the available resources in san francisco about persons who know about historical buildings and jeremy paul permit consul stapt that does a lot of work trying to help people try and solve permit issues, many of which relate to learning the legal issues of their building and sorting out the records and, the survey coordinator for the planning department and historic research surveying is becoming more and more important and just recently we got a substantial cash settlement from a problem that took place at the moratorium that will be surveying and i don't think that's going through the planning department but the survey resources are so important and that's the settlement of a lawsuit is let's do more surveying. alan, right side is records management, arad yen cussad yen manager of records the department of building commission ran out of space so we
diversity issues within the addiction and recovery field. joining us in our panel today are dr. h. westley clark, director, center for substance abuse treatment, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland. marco e. jacome, chief executive officer, healthcare alternative systems incorporated, chicago, illinois. john de miranda, president and ceo, stepping stone, san diego, california. william lossiah-bratt, board of directors, southeastern regional representative, faces and voices of recovery, cherokee, north carolina. dr. clark, why should we be concerned about ethnic and racial differences within the addiction and recovery field, as well as other differences? well, one of the things that we want to make sure is that people who have substance use problems are able to recover and that materials that we use can assist them in that process. and so, you know, there are differences associated with cultural values and beliefs, starting from how one physiologically responds to a particular substance misuse to how ce
. in this case, where there are lots of people with disabilities who use this office, they have a sign in this, you can see access is on the side of the building, it's about 100 feet down the street. and here it is, here is the accessible entrance on the side of the building and it's theoretically part of the main path of travel, it's not locked, you don't have to ring a bell, you just have an alternate means of accessible entry to the area. it doesn't take you through the back alleys of the building, theoretically. >> the previous slide was a really good slide to show, even though you don't have wheelchair access at this entrance because there's steps at that location, that you still provide the and rail for somebody who is semi ambulatory coming down the steps to grab on to. even though there is an accessible entrance a little bit further down the road, there's still things that have been implemented there on the stairs. >> but one thing that hasn't been done is striping so people with low vision can see. every tread should have striping. it would seem that the readily achievable standards f
are not doing our part to help change it. if that is true, i want jerry to tell us whether or not he agrees with that assessment. >> do you agree with that? >> jonathan said something that i absolutely agree with. that is the media reflects what the public wants. in my view, the media, in general, feed a voracious appetite for vengeance by an informed public. often influenced by fear, prejudice, and ignorance. i think one of the reasons criminal defense lawyers argued so poorly is people do not understand the source of crime. they want simple, quick responses to a complicated long- term solutions. you cannot fight crime by doing what the governor is doing, cutting social services and building new prisons. [applause] you do not have to be a rocket scientist to understand. all of us who have been involved in the criminal-justice system know where people who commit crimes come from. they are poor people, people of color, victims of abuse, the mentally ill, people with substance abuse problems. there are the people that fall through the cracks of society. but that is the public read what the pu
. if you want to show us a mistakes has been made you bring that documentation forward. this is the key government document. someone mentioned the 3r report. it's a collection of records and not an original source. it's a collection saying yes there was a permit issued on such and such date. it's not the original. just a reference to the originals. if someone says my, 3r says two units but it's three, the 3r report is not the controlling document. it's simply an information compilation. here's a report on page 316. >> again, the 3r report is made up from the dob meants from the micro film so theoretically they should both match. >> but there are many things were where their are questions if their good. >> is there anything that's good? >> what is this complete compilation. there is no single source of documents and that's message i'm trying give. >> i don't think that you should be or make a blanket statement that people are saying 3 r's are not good but their limited utility. their intended to tell a buyer of a piece of property what the building department thinks it knows at any
to folks like us, but it does not play all that well with people who are afraid of crime, people who are out of work. part of the message has to become it seems to me, going back to the sources of crime, not from an economic point of view, if you want to save money, you should do things that effectively will fight crime, as opposed to making you feel tougher and stronger. also, if you can get part of the message out that it is a tragedy when anyone is wrongfully convicted, for that person, for their family and friends, but the other part is, if there are wrongfully convicted, there is somebody out there who is actually the criminal. part of the message has to be financial. we have been told for years people vote with their pocketbooks, so you have to make a financial analysis. i am certain it would save an enormous amount of money. it also have to get people to understand by making the criminal justice system work, you make yourself safer. not just by feeding your ego or feeding your prejudice, let's get them, let's get them. you never know when you are going to be one of them. [appl
believe i used the word braiding. . i am going to use the special education recommendations. the recommendations we are anticipating from our special education audit are going to be extensive and far reaching in every school. you are going to take those recommendations along with the process of each of the school improvement grants to determine what the reform will look like in the schools. will it look like a different instructional focus, a longer day? will the after-school look like? -- what will the after-school look like? some of our schools are magnet schools. how do you implement and develop a magnet strand along with the special education redesign and possible language pathways? we really do not even know what is on the table yet. they are all interconnected. vice president mendoza: remember that some of these program developments may affect capacity. we are presuming schools and programs. commissioner norton: on hoover, for example, where we are going to save the spanish immersion program -- is that back on the table? are those kind of decisions going to be definite
on either later tonight or later. are we on the correct course? does the board what us to redesign transportation within this? how important is it to reduce the transportation budget, and does the board want us to provide transportation to the after-school programs until this comes to fruition. i would just say that in the board members are already aware of this, but there has been a more intense effort to conceptualize more seamless after-school programs at all or most of our school sites that will really change the need for students to change the there have been for after-school programs. and then, what are the board spots about grandfathering this? currently, students have been riding, but that would not force us to continue if we were focusing on both ways for the policy. one of the things i will mention before we wrap up is that we know there has been a fair amount of discussion over the years around whether we should charge fees for students who are writing the general education buses, and that is something we are still continuing to look at, and let me point out that if we w
to vandalism into a masterpiece. let us take a look. >> part of me has so much compassion for other graffiti artists. i understand why they are doing what they do. for me, it was something that was so hard to get out of. the lifestyle in general. j and tagging is addicting. i used to be on these routes. i have compassion for these guys. a lot of these guys are super talented. i am just trying to find the median to still be involved but still do my thing as an artist and work with the city, like we are doing. we are doing this wall in a collaboration with the san francisco arts commission. basically what they are doing is trying to get rid of some of the tags and by putting up murals. they are cooking up graffiti artists with business owners. today, we are trying to get a lot of this wall buffed out and covered it. then we will spray on some sketches of what we are going to do. the rain is coming tomorrow. it should be here for a few days. we want others to know that there are artists working on this wall. the owner of this building, she has had to pay a lot of money to keep on paying over th
] >> thank yo welcome, and thank you to taking the time to join us as we celebrate and have the official celebration of asian pacific american heritage month. the theme of this year's celebration is celebrate heritage, celebrate community. looking around this room, i know the lights are dim, but many of us in asian pacific american communities may look alike to others. but we all know that the community is truly diverse. according to census information, this community is made up of over 50 ethnic groups, and many of them have made san francisco their home. there is so much to appreciate in eachest nick culture and so much to celebrate when the community comes together as one, and thus the spirit of our celebration every year. >> the members of this economy think about how do we celebrate community, what came to our mind are all the community centers throughout the city and county of san francisco that has been serving the asian pacific american community. these are places where communities gather for services and programs or just to have fun with each other, have a good time. in other wo
triggered. there's the state stuff, there's the ada compliance, and the ada uses something called readily achievable and we'll talk a little bit about what readily achievable means. in your handouts today you will find these defined much more closely. if you have an employee who requires some accommodation for their physical disability, you are required under federal law to provide some accommodation for their needs and this andout today, which is available at the building department, call us at 558-6205 and we'll send you a copy of this -- can include everything from your work station to your tty telephone. two more things i want to define. one is temporary usage. someone says, oh, no, i'm just selling hot dogs off a stand so i don't have to comply. >> i have heard that occasionally. >> people say that. they have to comply? yeah, they have to make reasonable efforts, they have to meet standards for disabled access even for temporary uses. if people put up a tent they have to provide access for temporary use if it's open to the public, like little portapotties that are of a sufficient si
, the light cycle built into it. >> it brings san francisco from one of the major cities in the u.s. to what is going to be the lead city in the country. >> city working on all sorts of things. we are trying to be new and innovative and go beyond the ada says and make life more successful for people. >> disability rights movement, the city has the overall legal obligation to manage and maintain the accessibility and right of way. with regards to the curb ramps, bounded by a groove border, 12-inch wide border. for people with low vision to get the same information. the shape of the domes, flush transition between the bolt bottom of the ramp and gutter. >> we have a beveled transition on the change in level, tape on the surfaces, temporary asphalt to fill in level changes, flush transition to temporary wood platform and ramp down into the street under the scaffoldinging. detectable ramps. they are all detectable. nothing down below or protruding that people are going to get snagged up on. smooth clean that nobody is going get caught up on. >> our no. 1 issue is what we see here, the uplifting
and industrial areas, and by cutting us off and putting us into this area, you are really affecting one girl and all of the other kids to one or two a year might come along, and who they play with at the park, who they eat with, they are not going to be with them. our area has one sort of commercial strip, and our building, actually, where people are out on the sidewalks, unlike a lot of areas with the district in the middle, and it makes more sense. thank you. >> hi, my name is -- i have to tell you, i saw on the list, i guess there is some controversy, on sanchez street, there is mckinley, and they understand you are not going to change this now, no matter where you draw the line, somebody will be mad. i am not throwing her under that bus. i feel terrible about that, but that is not going to help. i do not want to do that. since this is not going to change, and i just wanted to let you know that. >> hi, my name is josephine, and i live in the sense that neighborhood, and i am very happy and very glad that you have these proposals -- i live in the sun setsu regionnse note -- i live in the s
like to thank the judges and the committee members for giving this award to us. and we would also like to thank the person who nominated us for this award. he is a very generous gentleman who donated his bone marrow to one of our patients. the donor program is a 20-year-old nonprofit organization that helps leukemia and other blood cancer patients to find their bone marrow matches. over the past 20 years we have recruited over 130,000 donors. it seems like a big number, but it is not enough. in the registry in the united states there are seven million registered don't years, and only 7% is asian american. because bone marrow is matched based on ethnicity, it is difficult for asian americans to find a match. if you haven't registered as a donor yet. take five minutes to do so. all you need to do is fill out a form and give a cheek swab sample. you don't even need to give blood. if your cheek sample matches, we will do another test to make sure you are the best match. so please take five minutes of your time and register today. we will continue our efforts to serve the community. thank y
, rich, and decadent, avocados have become a staple for many of us. according to the california avocado commission, about 43% of all u.s. households buy avocados regularly now. so when you think of avocados, you probably think of this, right? guacamole. but today farmers and chefs are proving that avocados can be so much more. good. ok, sure, what's not to like about guacamole? i mean, we do eat a lot of it. in fact, more than 49 million pounds of avocados in the form of guacamole will be consumed on super bowl sunday alone. but at hawks restaurant in granite bay, they're exploring different ways to use the alligator pear, otherwise known as an avocado. >> we like using california avocados because they're grown as close as an avocado can be. these are from the simi valley. they're really versatile. they're rich. as you can see, we puree them. we serve them somewhat chunky. we can wrap things in them. they're just real versatile. and they're tasty. >> but chefs like michael are just part of the equation of educating consumers on the many fabulous attributes of avocados. the real groundwo
systems that can be used to find businesses or get driving directions or check on traffic conditions. all digital maps. >> gis is used in the city of san francisco to better support what departments do. >> you imagine all the various elements of a city including parcels and the critical infrastructure where the storm drains are. the city access like the traffic lights and fire hydrants. anything you is represent in a geo graphic space with be stored for retrieval and analysis. >> the department of public works they maintain what goes on in the right-of-way, looking to dig up the streets to put in a pipe. with the permit. with mapping you click on the map, click on the street and up will come up the nchgz that will help them make a decision. currently available is sf parcel the assessor's application. you can go to the assessor's website and bring up a map of san francisco you can search by address and get information about any place in san francisco. you can search by address and find incidents of crime in san francisco in the last 90 days. we have [inaudible] which allows you to click
. the subject is very important to all of us, so we are going to the answers are available, and we will begin with the staff presentation. superintended? >> yes, before we turn it over to arlene and archie, i really do want to commend one person for taking on this challenge and j this great input over a long time, actually, but particularly in the last couple of months. i think this has been very valuable for us, and i think you will see this evening that we have taken the time to really hear what our community has to say, so thank you. thank you, commissioners, and superintendent, and the public. i have a presentation tonight that is divided intongd three attendance areas. the third is the transportation policy. i begin, i wanty that there has been a lot of information made available over the last two years. i know it is always great tp;! have more data, but it is good for people to have an idea of how to access the data, so there is a website, at sfpuc. in the objectives tonight are two sure we have heard from the and we are thankful particularlt couple of months, have invested a lot of ti
called him cake, he used to steal the warm cake that his mother put out. he would cut a slice and run off to the crawl space. they call him cake. i use that in my story. those 2 come from my grandmother, she was the germ, the seed of those 2 books and many others. let's go back to that front porch again. this time daddy james is the story teller. we sit at his feet and listen about stories about sara and pat and nollen. that is my brother, my sister, and me. we thought we were just as clever and smart and just as brave as the children in his story. he told stories vaguely familiar, but different some how because he told them his way. you see, i had no idea my grandfather was a functional illiterate and encouraged all 3 of us, his grandchildren to read. the way he encouraged me, he'd say y'all read to me what they taught you up at the schoolhouse today. i would whip out my dick and jane. see jane run. run, he endured that. he allowed me to read to him. i had no idea in other families the adults read to children. in my house, children read to the adults. imagine the confidence t
mary jacobs, and i thank you, mary grace cohan, patricia gray, nancy, and suzanne, who helped us this year in choosing our fabulous teachers and principals. they deserve a round of applause. in addition to everything you are receiving, you are also getting certificates of honor from our major, from a single woman, senator, and supervisor duufty, so all of your guests are in your back acknowledging the fabulous work you have done. when we started this program, we wanted to be able to a knowledge not just one teacher, but a teacher for everyone because we have so many fabulous features, so it is too difficult to choose one. when i say she is representing september, she is actually representing the entire year this year as a teacher of the year. trudy osmond is our kindergarten teacher. [applause] that a-ha moment when children realize that they can be brave and accomplish those tasks that they did not think they could do or want to do with just a little encouragement and cheerleading from their teachers. students come and go, and many leave their footprint on your heart. individual
, in the way that we deliver the news, in the way that we received the news. we have with us a stellar panel of top thinkers in the fields of media, education, finance, and government represented, but we also wanted to encourage an audience to participate and drive to a's discussion. so you are asked to ask discussions -- questions. if you would like to ask questions, please move toward the middle aisle. as tom mentioned also, our conversation will be divided into five parts. first, we will talk about the quality of reporting in the past few years. we will also talk about ways to sustain quality journalism today and in the upcoming years. next we will move on to shielding journalism from financial pressures from advertisers, foundations, and the government. how to encourage cultural diversity in the media is also a topic we want to talk about. constitutional protection at a time when the very definition of the journalist is changing. who is a journalist? that is a key question we can ask today. let's go to sandeep to who we have today. >> we have a stellar panel. you're not kidding. let me b
that actually changed the practice in santa clara. i want to start with amy and if you can tell us what is "ordinary injustice" and how does it manifest itself? >> ordinary injustice happens in a courtroom where there are smart, committed, hard-working people, professionals. but they are routinely acting in ways that fall short. what it is that people and their positions are supposed to be doing. and they don't even realize that anything is missing or that their behavior has devastating consequences for regular people's lives. so this is really the meaning of ordinary injustice that mistakes become routine and the legal professionals can no longer see their role in them. >> can you give us some examples of what you found in your eight-year saga of studying the court system? >> sure. the best way to perhaps get into it is to tell you how i first came across it. i had just graduated law school from stanford and i had clerked for a federal appellate judge in miami and the jurisdiction was florida, alabama and georgia and i wrote a story after my clerkship for the "nation" magazine and it w
access. to access to each other. something that gives us a sense of where we are in society. debbiwe in the media had a veryd time keeping up with the changes in society. how you keep up with the changes of san francisco if you are just one outlet. if a woman that lives in an alley starts off of the city lights in columbus, 91 years old, her building is sold into a tenant conversion into will be evicted after six years and her 48-year-old son hangs himself because he cannot find an alternative place for her to live, that is on the front page. it needs to be on our radar, that is who we are. that is what i want to know about the city i live in. meeting the challenge of news in its traditional, communal role. it cannot just be about the obama health care plan. government does not have the foggiest clue what is happening amongst governments. that is what i am worried about. technology is such that widens the gap. we know less about each other in this fragmented media landscape. >> the audience is now welcome to ask a question. if you have one, please line up over here. right here on the
should always be proud of what it is that we do for people and in fact, what they return to us. we are made better by the work that we do and may god bless all of your efforts. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, jose. the event today is also sponsored by the california attorneys for criminal justice. i also want to especially thank the rosenberg foundation and executive director tim solard who provided a grant to make this possible so thank you so much the rosenberg foundation and of course i want to thank all the volunteers who worked so hard to make this event happen today. now i'm very excited to introduce our keynote speaker. our keynote speaker is and was the first "lady lawyer" in california. it's true. because when she decided that she wanted to become a lawyer, there was one problem, the law in california didn't allow it. and so she had to change the law, which she did. she also wanted to go to law school right here at hastings college of law but they had a policy that said only men could go do that law school so she sued hastings college of the law and she changed that an
to organize the convicts criminology group. there is now 30 of us. we are all ex cons, ph.d., and professors at different universities. because i'm a convicted felon, i should say i went to federal prison for nine years. >> [inaudible] i came to a public forum, which included a lot of attorneys, to try to rectify these matters. >> [inaudible] >> i am here. i will be outside for five minutes with this information. [inaudible] >> thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. >> continue, dr. richard s. -- dr. richards. >> [inaudible] >> we love the excitement. this is all intentional. >> i'm happy to be in san francisco, and that kind of brings me to the point i want to say. this morning, we were in the courtroom, and we have lawyers, public defenders talking about legal cases, talking about the roles they play. what i think has been lost here, and maybe even this gentleman kind of raised it, is what happens to these defendants? what happens when they go back into the court, into the lock up after they have pled guilty? about 95% of them plead guilty. you know that they are being fo
comfortable with sex. some of us do not even know who we are, right? from day to day, right? you know, i mean, sex is a very complicated issue. the idea that sexual behavior and people's aberrations with it or problems with it or confusions should send them to present for life sentences. in wisconsin, they have the same thing in iowa and illinois -- actually have built prisons just for sex offenders. can you imagine? the entire prison are sex offenders, mostly young men. that is what they are. young men who are confused about their sexuality. as my son was or your son was. i'm going to continue with this, just some of the suggestions we have had. get rid of the word "officer." you have police officers -- isn't that enough? we have, like, 2 million of them. it should be social workers, correctional workers. parole workers. get rid of parole officers and probation officers all together. i call them resource centers so that when somebody comes out of jail or prison, that it would not matter if they came out of a mental hospital or and mentally retarded group home or they are getting out of jail
from the court to the prosecutors, he had never seen a case that has seen more of use in his career. attorney general holder was right in terms of acting swiftly, in terms of throwing out that condition. he also stated that the department of justice's office of professional responsibility would investigate the actions of the two officers, yet a year after that, we still have heard nothing out of office regarding their conduct. the department of justice has publicly talked about how they increased training in terms of discovery obligations, and they have issued memos in terms of what they are supposed to be doing, yet they have yet to do anything regarding the behavior of those prosecutors. contrast that to the case that occurred a couple years ago, that boasts -- that of the prosecutor in north carolina, where six months after the charges were brought against the lacrosse students, and they were charged with rape, the defense attorneys uncovered evidence in the files, and north carolina is open, but they found evidence in the files showing their clients were innocent. the state atto
it over, and the judges were telling us, you are making a mountain out of a molehill. little did we know there was all this bubbling underneath, so it is true the onus of the burden is on the defense, because once we have the information we have to file the motion. it is a tremendous amount of work we have to do, but what we need to do is make sure there is a process so people who were convicted can bring their cases back to court. our next question from the audience says, in santa clara county when people plead guilty to misdemeanors, what happened? did they go to jail? for how long? what type of crimes? >> one of the chief dynamics that was happening was that many people were faced with a choice between staying in jail sometimes up to a week or even longer waiting for a public defender to get to their case for just to get out right fair, -- right there, because the judge was basically saying, plead guilty. what is the big deal? that was the impression. everybody was taking the deal. you could almost see them talking to each other. you could see them make that decision. any pointed out
by this year's academy award winner "slumdog millionaire." the movie reminds us that we are blessed to be living in america where the freedoms and opportunities we have allow us to live richly like millionaires. music, please! ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> let's give a round of applause for our par continue pants. i would like to thank the core gaffer, the remixer. let's invite claudine chang to come up here with the steering members, the elected officials. come up to the party and stay here with us. ♪ ♪ >> who says asians don't have rhythm? that's it,on't have rhythm? that's it, ladies and gentlemen, for the kickoff performance for asian-pacific american heritage month. thank you very much for coming. we hope to see you at the reception. good night! >> i have 2 job titles. i'm manager of the tour program as well as i am the historyian of city hall. this building is multifaceted to say the very least it's a municipal building that operates the city and county of san francisco. this building was a dream that became a reality of a man by the name of james jun
that natives used for making houses. the construction of the pond is based on abalone house construction. at the bottom of the form, it is woven into a rope which transforms into a manufactured rope. that is a reference to the cordish company, a big industry at the waterfront that went along with the shipbuilding industry. other examples of art work in libraries that you might be interested in seeing it is dana zed's glass shatters in front of a library. there are a wall sculptures in the lobby of the glen park branch library. and then there is an illuminated book on the wall of the mission bay library. >> "ocean current." we are on ocean avenue, so there is a connection to that. that is what this is about. culmination of all lot of dialogue, processing over a five-year period. that is longer than most art projects take, but i really feel like the product was enriched from that. making the sculpture involves forging and fabricating steel. we used to deal to create this flowing, central sculptor, heating, bending, grinding, painting, bending, and adding a patina to it. layers and layers o
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